Finding the current buffer’s filename


I was recently faced with the problem that in order for me to be able to send a file off to GHC for type checking and parsing (not in that order) I would need to know the full filename.

But the problem is, the only thing I have if a ITextBuffer object. Luckily, almost every object in Visual Studio 2010 has a “Properties” well, property.

So after looking around I found out that this collection contains the ITextDocument object i so desperately need. But ran into one problem. This is a dictionary so logically I would need the key of that object.

The irritation here was that the Key for this object seems to be an type, but How would I create a ITextDocument type? just using ITextDocument as a type isn’t correct, and because I just have the interface, I can’t call GetType() on it. Now I was stuck, having no idea how to construct the key.

Fortunately I realize that I would only need to look this up once, when my Tagger is initialized. So I decided to just do a linear lookup in the dictionary and select the first matching type.

It’s arguably not the way it should be done, But should be fine for my purposes, the code ended up looking like

/// <summary>
/// Finds the first value with the specified type inside the property bag.
/// This is used because I don’t know how to get the Visual Studio instantiated
/// types out of the bag. So I’m doing runtime matching. It would only be done once
/// per buffer so shouldn’t be too bad.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">Type of the result</typeparam>
/// <param name="buffer">buffer to look in</param>
/// <returns>Object of the requested type</returns>
/// <exception cref="InvalidOperationException">Gets thrown if the type is not found inside the property dictionary</exception>
public static T getPropertyFromBuffer<T>(ITextBuffer buffer)
{
    foreach (var item in buffer.Properties.PropertyList)
    {
        if (item.Value is T)
            return (T)item.Value;
    }
    throw new InvalidOperationException("The specified type could not be found inside the property bag");
}

So at runtime it uses the generic type T to do lookups, a simple use of this would be

this.document = Utils.EditorUtils.getPropertyFromBuffer<ITextDocument>(this.buffer);

and that’s how I lookup my ITextDocument object :)

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About Tamar Christina

Master Student at the University of Utrecht in The Netherlands.

Posted on May 18, 2010, in C#, Editor, Visual Studio 2010, VSX. Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Thanks Tamar and Olav — saved me a load of poking around!

  2. Thank you, I had the same problem! But looking at your solution, wouldn’t it work just to write:
    var document = buffer.Properties.GetProperty(typeof (ITextDocument));

    • yes actually. When I was first trying this I was getting errors from intellisense, I later discovered that the errors went away after a full recompile, so they were most likely unrelated. I just never updated the post :)
      Having just returned to C# (and imperative programming in general) I was a bit rusty :)

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